“Nada que declarar” – a book by Teresa Ruiz Rosas

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If you happen to be in Luxembourg on the 29th of April 2017, don’t miss the chance to meet Peruvian writer Teresa Ruiy Rosa who will present her latest book “Nada que declarar”.  Written in Spanish, the book deals with the theme of women trafficking and migration, through the stories of two women, between Peru and Germany and is currently being translated into French.

The event is part of Time for Equality’s campaign “Learn/Share/Take Action” aimed at raising awareness on human trafficking and modern day slavery by making use of films, books and art. Learn more about Time for Equality here and find more details about the event here.

Teresa Ruiz Rosas was born in Arequipa, Peru in 1956. She studied literature and linguistics in Arequipa, Budapest, Barcelona and Freiburg and was a finalist for the 1994 Premio Herralde de Novela and the 1999 Juan Rulfo prize for short stories, awarded by the Instituto Cervantes in Paris.

Alongside her writing, she also translates German and Hungarian literature into Spanish. Ruiz Rosas lives in Cologne.

Novels:

 El copista

Barcelona: Anagrama 1994, 126 p.

German:  Ammann 1996

Netherlands: Wereldbibliothek 1998

La falaz posteridad

Lima (Peru only): Ed. San Marcos 2007, 368 p.

La mujer cambiada

Lima(Peru only): Ed. San Marcos 2008, 164 p.

Germany: Ralf Liebe Verlag

Wer fragt schon nach ‘Kuhle Wampe.’

Von der Liebe und anderen Gemeinheiten

Weilerswist: Ralf Liebe Verlag 2008, 320 p.

 Stories:

 El desván

Arequipa: La Campana Catalina 1989, 112 p.

German:Gallucci Verlag 1990

 Detrás de la Calle Toledo

Lima: Antares Artes & Letras 2004, 84 p. (trilingual: English, German, Spanish)

Das Porträt hat Dich geblendet

Bonn: Free Pen Verlag 2005, 192 p.

(bilingual: German, Spanish)

Book recommendation – “Dubliners” by James Joyce

Dubliners James JoyceIn “Dubliners” published in 1914, Joyce paints a literary portrait of an entire society.

The book comprises 15 short stories that glimpse into the lives of different sets of people in Dublin. The author is exploring what it measn to be Irish at a time in history when the Northern Ireland issue was coming to the fore and World War I was about to begin.

“Dubliners” is a subtle critique of the Irish capital, imbued with an underlying tone of tragedy. Through his various characters, Joyce displays the complicated relationships, hardships and mundane details of everyday life and the desire for escape.

“One by one they were all becoming shades. Better pass boldy into that other world, in the full glory of some passion, than fade and wither dismally with age.”

“Dubliners” is currently on sale at the Librairie Française in Luxembourg  city-centre.